UK  

Playing the waiting game

Alison Steed

Alison Steed

Oh my! Or maybe I should be saying ‘Oh May!’ Yes, Theresa has gone and done it – put the country in a far less stable position than it was before the election – and now we play a waiting game to see what happens next.

Yes, Theresa has gone and done it, put the country in a far less stable position than it was, and now we play a waiting game to see what happens next.

At the time of writing, there was no formal agreement with the DUP – the climate-change denying, anti-abortion, anti-LGBT rights party that the PM is courting to work with her to create stability in the country – about how they would support Mrs May’s now minority government. But talks are continuing. Apparently.

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At the time of writing, there was no formal agreement with the DUP – the climate-change denying, anti-abortion, anti-LGBT rights party that the prime minister is courting to work with her to create stability in the country – about how they would support Mrs May’s now minority government. But talks are continuing. Apparently.

There is even talk that the Queen’s Speech will be delayed this year as the PM struggles to clear up the mess – she called it such herself in front of the influential 1922 Committee – she has created by calling an election that really did not need to happen. 

Hung parliament

She had a majority; not a big majority to be fair, but a majority all the same. Now, we have a hung parliament with a PM who can surely only be living on borrowed time in that role, and the single biggest series of negotiations in the UK’s recent history hurtling towards us with ferocious speed.

For now, it does not even seem that the UK has a negotiating strategy with the EU, much less one that is on a stable footing – or a “strong and stable” footing, to coin a singularly failing phrase that was bandied about with abandon during the Conservative campaign.

You may remember that back in April I suggested that Mrs May might not get the result she hoped for, and that there was a chance the country would be less rather than more stable after the election than before. 

Sadly, I was right.

However, I think there are a number of good things that have come out of this election, despite the uncertainty and the fact that the Tories are cosying up to a party that seems decades out of step with the rest of the world.

The aim of Mrs May was to increase her majority in the Commons so she would be able to bulldoze through legislation with less parliamentary scrutiny than it would otherwise have had. 

The idea that we should have something as fundamental to our way of life as leaving the EU pass without serious debate and challenge to me is frankly horrifying. That is not how democracy works.