Pensions  

Under 34s feel most stressed about retirement

Under 34s feel most stressed about retirement
 

Young adults aged 25 to 34 feel the most pressure when it comes to retirement planning, according to research from Aviva.

A survey of 2,000 consumers showed that 74 per cent of that age group feel anxious and stressed when it comes to pensions and retirement.

This compared to 61 per cent across all age groups, with the over 55 category reported to have the lowest levels of stress. 

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However, pressure about retirement was evident in all age groups, as 71 per cent of respondents confessed to being worried about whether or not they will have enough money set aside at retirement to do all the things they want to do.

Aviva’s head of savings and retirement, Alistair McQueen said given the current economic climate, the survey results were no surprise.

“It’s only natural, in a world where most people are worried about things that are beyond your control - the rising cost of living, increasing inflation, and interest rates that haven’t been seen for years – that you may also feel out of depth when it comes to things like pensions and later life preparations. 

“However, with a little planning, and simple rules of thumb, you can easily feel more in control of your savings and know if you are on track for the lifestyle you want in your retirement,” McQueen said.

Percentage of respondents who say they find the following questions “stressful”, split into age groups

Question

Average % stressed across all age groups

16-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55+

Will I have enough money to do the things I want to do when I retire?

71%

72%

85%

82%

75%

59%

Will I have enough money to retire as early as I would like to?

66%

68%

81%

78%

73%

50%

How long will my pension last me?

65%

65%

80%

75%

71%

51%

Am I paying enough into my pension?

59%

61%

77%

72%

69%

42%

How long will retirement be?

59%

64%

74%

70%

63%

45%

Will I have enough money to help my children/grandchildren when I retire?

56%

65%

73%

66%

55%

41%

Should I have more than one pension?

50%

57%

70%

63%

53%

34%

How early do I need to pay into my pension?

49%

57%

70%

64%

52%

30%

Source: Aviva

In recognition of stress awareness week this week, Aviva released a number of guidance points around retirement to help give people more control over when they do it and how much they have.

  1. How long? Aim to save for retirement at least 40 years before you want to retire. 
  2. How much? Try to save at least 12.5 per cent of your salary towards your pension every month – this can include money from you, your employer, and the government.
  3. Final pot size? Aim to amass a pension pot of at least 10 times your salary by the time you retire.
  4. Tax relief: Take advantage of the tax relief offered by the government when saving in a pension - for every £8 you save, the tax man adds an extra £2.
  5. Employer contributions: Every employer in the UK must provide eligible employees with a workplace pension
  6. Invest wisely: By investing your money, in a pension or elsewhere, your money can grow through to your target retirement date.
  7. Keep checking: Use your annual pension statement to check if you are on track for your retirement target.
  8. Reframe your expectations: Life expectancy in retirement could be 20 years or more, so bear in mind how long your money may need to last.
  9. Shop around: The retirement incomes on offer in return for your amassed pension pot will likely differ. Find the best deal for you as this could make a significant difference
  10. Use the pension freedoms: From 2015 the pension freedoms allow more flexibility in retirement planning, but take time to understand the options before acting. 
  11. Search for lost pensions: There are close to 3mn lost pensions in the UK where pension providers and customers have lost touch with each other, this equates to £26.6bn, or £9,470 per person.
  12. Mindfulness: As well as taking control of your later life planning, try mindfulness practices, get enough good quality sleep, eat well and take time to reconnect with nature. 

Of those surveyed, the number of people who seek support in relation to their later life was a low proportion of the total. 

More than a quarter of people surveyed (28 per cent) sought support or guidance with later life planning from their family and friends, but almost half (48 per cent) of those 16 to 24 did. 

Meanwhile, almost a quarter of those surveyed (23 per cent) turned to their employer or received help and support through their workplace, and 18 per cent say they spoke to a financial adviser.

jane.matthews@ft.com