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Young lead the way on advice but gap continues

Young lead the way on advice but gap continues

The younger generation is most likely to have a financial adviser according to recent research, but warning bells have been sounded an advice gap still persists amid ongoing concerns surrounding cost. 

According to a survey of more than 2,000 consumers by advice firm Progeny, 41 per cent of people with an adviser sat in the 18-34 age group. 

This compared with 17 per cent in the 45-54 age demographic and 18 per cent from the over 65s.  

Neil Moles, chief executive at Progeny, said the results gave reason to be optimistic. 

He said: "The fact that 18-34-year-olds are the most likely demographic to have a financial adviser is a sign that the young generation get it.  

"But we need build on this so that choosing a financial adviser becomes a natural step in life, and second nature to the next generation."

But the survey also found evidence of a persisting advice gap, particularly highlighting ongoing perceptions around the cost of a financial adviser. 

Only one in four respondents had an adviser and of those who did not, 83 per cent felt advice "was not for them". 

A third raised concerns over advisers being too expensive and more than a quarter felt financial advice was for people with more money than they had. 

More than one in ten said they went to Google for financial advice.

Mr Moles said: "On the one hand, people recognise they need to know more about financial matters but at the same time feel that financial advice is not for them. 

"Many of the people who would benefit hugely from advice don’t realise they need it which means we, as an industry, are clearly not doing a good enough job of demonstrating the advantages. 

"It’s up to us to show how a good financial plan can deliver life-changing results – financially and emotionally – not just for the individual but for future generations of their family." 

rachel.mortimer@ft.com

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