Buy-to-let  

How landlords are tackling the biting tax changes

How landlords are tackling the biting tax changes

Landlord clients are tackling the tax and regulatory changes hitting their pockets by taking advantage of low mortgage rates, using limited company structures, opting for higher yielding properties and branching further afield, brokers have said.

The buy-to-let market grew rapidly after the financial crisis but has since taken a beating as a number of tax and regulatory changes have made the private rental sector a less lucrative option.

In fact more than a third of landlords are planning to sell at least part of their portfolio in 2020 as the changes continue to bite in a system “weighted against them”.

Accumulate Capital polled 750 investors in December and found 37 per cent of landlords were planning to sell one or more of their properties, with 61 per cent of them blaming increasing regulations and taxes.

The changes led many to predict the buy-to-let market would shrink in size leaving only ‘professional landlords’ able to make viable returns.

Of those keen to sell, 72 per cent thought the current tax and regulation measures were unfairly weight against them while 69 per cent said the costs of managing their portfolio had risen “considerably” over the past five years.

But brokers have said many of their landlord clients were sticking with the private rental sector and diversifying their portfolio or shaking up their own system to deal with changes.

David Hollingworth, associate director of communications at L&C Mortgages, said: “[The changes] will no doubt lead some to hold their position rather than add more properties, particularly the more amateur landlord whilst they review their approach.

“However, many are taking action in controlling their costs by taking advantage of low mortgage rates and the use of limited company lending to grow investments.”

Due to the tax shake up, limited company status is more attractive to landlords as changes would not affect them and they can offset mortgage interest against profits which are subject to corporation tax instead of income tax rates, which is cheaper.

Average mortgage rates have also been slashed over the past few years as lenders battle in a “race to the bottom” which has seen two-year fixed rates for buy-to-let properties fall below 1.3 per cent.

Mr Hollingworth added: “While some will be considering whether it might be the right time to sell certain properties in light of the tougher conditions, there’s little to suggest that landlords are offloading property in significant numbers.”

Rachel Lummis, mortgage and protection adviser at Xpress Mortgages, said although buy-to-let enquiries from new and smaller landlords had plummeted, the larger portfolios were still transacting.

She said: “Larger portfolio landlords are still transacting, just differently from a few years ago.

“Clients are remortgaging existing properties to not only secure decent long-term fixed rates but to also raise capital for further investment.”

Ms Lummis said the properties being added to portfolios had moved from standard flats and houses to more high-yielding houses of multiple occupancy or multi-unit blocks, as well as in locations around the country not previously considered.